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Your sales voice: what is it saying to you, what is it saying to others? PDF Print E-mail

I was recently at Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas, giving a seminar sponsored by Sales & Marketing Executives International. I had an informal logistics meeting with some of the association members before the event when Jamie, the young woman who directed me to my preparation room, talked to me about her career. I asked her what she was seeking to become.

Her response startled me. She said, “I’m still trying to find my voice.”

I was taken aback because I expected some alternate career choice, or something along the lines of “make a lot of money,” or “get a job in event planning.” But no, she was seeking something much higher.

Jamie was seeking to gain control of her self and her power first, and find her career path second. We talked about “voice” for a while, and I began to type to capture the thoughts. What came out of the brief conversation will benefit you and your career, and help you understand who you are and who you seek to become.

Jamie was looking for her voice to come from something she believed in that would make her voice stronger, more resonant, more powerful, and more believable.

How do you speak?

Not the just words, the voice that you project. Your voice is a statement and picture of your character, your poise, and your persona. It’s a statement of belief, confidence, and personal power.

Where does your voice come from?

How do you “find” it?

And once you do, how do you master it?

BE AWARE: Your voice has nothing to do with your selling skills or your product knowledge. Your voice is way beyond that.

GOOD NEWS: You don’t have to look far. Most of your voice is right at the tip of your tongue. The rest of it is mental and emotional.

ANSWER: It STARTS with your inner voice. It’s the language you speak to yourself BEFORE you say a word.

Your voice becomes yours, and authentically yours, when you…

• do what you believe in.

• do what you’re passionate about.

• work in your chosen field.

• find your calling.

• discover something you feel you were made or born to do.

• do something you love.

EASY WAY TO START THE DISCOVERY: Write down the hobby or sport you love best, or the sporting event you go to because you love to see your team play and cheer them on.

My friend, Hall of Fame baseball player Dave Winfield, said it as simply and as completely as I have ever heard it, “I loved baseball and baseball loved me back.”

Here are the elements of voice:

You have decided to pursue your chosen path.

You have belief in who you are.

You have belief in what you do.

You have a desire to succeed.

You’re personally prepared – attitude, enthusiasm, friendliness, and ideas.

You maintain self-confidence that comes from your heart, not from your head.

Your enthusiasm is real.

Your sincerity is evident.

You’re eager to master every aspect of what you do.

Your passion is contagious.

Your moxie engages others.

Your desire to improve is never ending.

You love what you do.

NOTE WELL: Your voice is not about how to make sales faster – your voice is how to make sales forever. For your voice to appear, you must possess ALL of these elements. Most people have a “weak” voice because they don’t love what they do, or lack sincerity, or they don’t fully believe in themselves, their company, or their product.

SUCCESS ACTION: Go back to this list and rate yourself on a 1-10 basis. Ten being the best, your highest possible score is 130. My bet is you’re 90 or below.

SUCCESS ACTION: Record your spoken voice ONCE A WEEK, and listen to it actively – which means take notes. By listening to yourself – arguably one of the toughest things on the planet to do – you will gain a true picture of where you are right now. Your jumping off point.

And for those of you living in the dark ages still trying to “find the pain” in your sales presentation, just record and listen to yourself – THAT’S the pain. The real pain of selling is listening to your voice trying to make a sale – it’s also funny as hell.

You’ll know your voice when you hear it.

It will speak to you before you ever say a word.

 

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training, seminars, and webinars - or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.

 
McLane Company breaks ground on Findlay Grocery Distribution Center PDF Print E-mail

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FINDLAY – Texas-based McLane Company, one of the nation’s leading wholesale suppliers to grocery retailers and restaurants, broke ground on a new facility on October 16. The company’s Findlay distribution center is located at 3200 McLane Drive.

The McLane Company grocery distribution center will create 425 jobs and invest $119 million into their new facility in Findlay, Ohio. McLane’s Grocery unit services more than 45,000 retail locations nationwide. The company expects this highly automated distribution center to greatly enhance its efficiency in servicing its valued customers throughout the Great Lakes region.

“We are excited to see the hard work on this project come to fruition,” said Findlay•Hancock County Economic Development Director Anthony Iriti, who worked closely with McLane executives and JobsOhio to bring the company to Findlay. “It has been our goal to bring skilled jobs, like those that will be needed at this cutting-edge facility. We are pleased to have McLane’s state-of-the-art facility as our anchor for the new industrial park.”

Lt. Governor Mary Taylor attended the groundbreaking ceremony, as well as Ohio Representative Robert Sprague, McLane COO Mike Youngblood, City of Findlay Mayor Lydia Mihalik, and Hancock County Commissioners Mark Gazarek, Philip Riegle, and Brian Robertson.

“The McLane Company is an excellent addition to the Findlay and Hancock County community, said Findlay Mayor, Lydia Mihalik. “This is yet again a testament that our community has the ability to attract innovative and emerging businesses.”

“We considered expansion sites in several states,” said McLane COO Mike Youngblood. “However, after working closely with the Governor‘s office and local officials in Hancock County, we were soon convinced that Findlay, Ohio was the best location for our newest grocery distribution center. We are confident in the strong, productive workforce there, and we recognize and appreciate all that is in place to help make a business like ours successful.”

 

(About McLane: McLane Company, Inc., is a $44 billion supply chain services leader providing grocery, foodservice and beverage solutions for convenience stores, mass merchants, drug stores and chain restaurants throughout the U.S. McLane buys, sells and delivers more than 50,000 different consumer products to nearly 90,000 locations across the U.S., and is a wholly owned unit of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (NYSE: BRK).

About JobsOhio: JobsOhio is a private, non-profit corporation designed to drive job creation and new capital investment in Ohio through business attraction, retention, and expansion efforts. Find out more at jobs-ohio.com.

 

The Findlay•Hancock County Alliance is a partnership bringing growth and prosperity to the Findlay/Hancock County community. Through a strong economic development focus, leadership programs, business building initiatives and volunteer opportunities, the Alliance helps position its community among the best micropolitan communities in the United States. The Alliance is a blend of the area’s best resources including the Findlay•Hancock County Chamber of Commerce, Findlay-Hancock County Economic Development and the Hancock County Convention & Visitors Bureau.)

 
Allen County reveals new Faces & Places interactive tool PDF Print E-mail

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LIMA - Lima/Allen County Chamber of Commerce has partnered with Allen Economic Development Group and the Lima-Allen County Convention & Visitors Bureau to develop a brand new and interactive tool that has helped market our community assets for business and tourism; therefore increasing business opportunities and attracting a talented and diverse workforce. This new interactive video resource is called Faces & Places. Faces & Places has been created for residents and local business owners to tell their personal story about our community. Each partner has invested in this program to make it successful and it is being utilized to showcase the hidden gems of Lima/Allen County and why it is a great place to live and work.

The website www.WeAreLimaAllenCounty.com/memberintro shows videos of members of our community discussing why they chose to stay in Lima/Allen County, locate their business within our region, or what a visitor to our area can experience with different day-trip options. Sponsor videos share their business stories, community resources, and quality of life.

“This website encompasses everything all three of our organizations try to do, all in one unique website. The video testimonials give a great perspective as to what makes our community strong, why visitors should add our community to their “must-see” destination list, and why others call our area home,” shares Christine Pleva, Executive Director, Lima-Allen County Convention & Visitors Bureau.

“We are proud to announce we are launching into year two of this interactive website www.WeAreLimaAllenCounty.com/memberintro. It is our hope that site visitors will continue to use this as a resource to learn more about the strength of our community, through our businesses, resources and people,” stated Jed Metzger, President and CEO of the Lima/Allen County Chamber of Commerce.

Jeff Sprague, President and CEO of the Allen Economic Development Group explains, “We saw this as an opportunity to expand outside just showcasing our traditional infrastructure and resources and really show why a potential site selector should choose to locate in Allen County – whether it be the quality of life the community has to offer, or access to business resources.”

To become involved or to learn more about the site please contact us at 419-222-6045 or visit www.WeAreLimaAllenCounty.com to learn more.

 
Area businesses recognized at area Small Business Awards PDF Print E-mail

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FINDLAY — Small Business is the heart of the American economy. Business owners give individuals – real people with names and faces – a chance to provide for their families, and an environment where people can learn and grow and express their creativity and talents.

The Findlay•Hancock County area is proud of its Small Businesses and those that lead them. In recognition of these courageous and inspiring individuals and their companies, the Findlay•Hancock County Chamber of Commerce was honored to present the 2014 Small Business Awards at the 51st Annual Small Business Awards luncheon on October 9, 2014 at Winebrenner Theological Seminary. Under the direction of Dionne Neubauer, Director of the Findlay•Hancock County Chamber of Commerce, over 200 business professionals were in attendance. Chris Oaks, of WFIN, served as the event emcee.

The following is a list of both small business and community awards that were distributed:

 

Awards

ATHENA Award

Presented to: Dr. Chris Ward, The University of Findlay

Sponsored by: Huntington Bank

SBRC Client Award

Presented to: Lori Bowman, The Dressing Room Boutique

Sponsored by: Small Business Resource Center

Women in Business Champion of the Year

Presented to: Cathy Linhart, House of Awards & Shoes

Sponsored by: WFIN-WKXA-106.3 The Fox Radio

Emerging Business of the Year

Presented to: The Sweet Retreat

Sponsored by: Six Disciplines

Small Business Manufacturing Excellence

Presented to: RPM Carbide Die, Inc.

Sponsored by: The Companies of Tall Timbers Industrial Park

Downtown Champion of the Year

Presented to: Daniel W. Clinger, RCM Architects, Retired

Sponsored by: Fifth Third Bank

Go Local Small Business Champion of the Year

Presented to: Hosmer Family Businesses

Sponsored by: First National Bank

Agriculture Enterprise Champion of the Year

Presented to: Kaleidoscope Farms

Sponsored by: Citizens National Bank

Diversity Small Business Champion of the Year

Presented to: Jack & Jin’s Thai Restaurant

Sponsored by: Marathon Petroleum Corp.

Professional of the Year

Presented to: Rooney & Ranzau, Ltd.

Sponsored by: Commercial Savings Bank

Family Owned Small Business Champion of the Year

Presented to: Dick’s Auto Supply

Sponsored by: CompManagement Inc. (CMI) &

CompManagement Health Systems (CHS)

Small Business Person of the Year

Presented to: Jim Barger, Media Links Advertising

Sponsored by: The University of Findlay

Small Business of the Year

Presented to: Stearns Companies, LLC

Sponsored by: First Federal Bank

Special Presentations

Dennis Russell “Our Spirit Shows” Award

Presented to: Findlay Girls Fastpitch Softball Club

Sponsored by: Hancock County Convention & Visitors Bureau

Distinguished Leadership Award

Presented to: Deb Wickerham, Hancock Historical Museum and Flag City Honor Flight

Sponsored by: Hancock Leadership Alumni Association

Community Partner Award

Presented to: Legacy Farmers Cooperative

Sponsored by: United Way of Hancock County

Blanchard Valley Center Your Hancock County Board of DD S.T.A.R. Awards

Presented to: g2 Revolution and Findlay Country Club

Special thanks also goes to the Bistro On Main, JYoakam Communication, Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield, Sink’s Flowers and Ohio Means Jobs Hancock County for their support of the event. For more information about this, or any other Chamber of Commerce programs, call 419-422-3313 or visit FindlayHancockChamber.com.

 

(The Findlay•Hancock County Alliance is a partnership bringing growth and prosperity to the Findlay/Hancock County community. Through a strong economic development focus, leadership programs, business building initiatives and volunteer opportunities, the Alliance helps position its community among the best micropolitan communities in the United States. The Alliance is a blend of the area’s best resources including the Findlay•Hancock County Chamber of Commerce, Findlay-Hancock County Economic Development and the Hancock County Convention & Visitors Bureau.)

 
Cloud Computing, BIM trends in construction industry PDF Print E-mail

BY STEPHANIE GROVES

Business Journal Writer

sgroves@delphosherald.com

 

A big benefit for construction professionals is utilizing cloud computing for its mobility. Whether at a job site or in the office, cloud computing allows the management of any aspect of a business anywhere there is an Internet connection and a mobile device. With cloud computing, tasks that used to require a presence at the office can be completed while out in the field.

Utilizing cloud computing can save businesses money by reducing IT costs, including server and computer upgrades and maintenance as well as the continuous purchase of new software and monitoring licenses. As businesses grow and expand, construction professionals can scale cloud computing needs to best suit their requirements.

Cloud computing can lead to better collaborations with clients and expedite the distribution of information when used in conjunction with Building Information Modeling (BIM). BIM is a method to generate and manage a digital representation of the physical and functional elements and characteristics of a facility.

For example, a combination of cloud computing and BIM creates data access for a client where a request for a change order can be made and the architect would then make changes to the building model. As a result, the contractor would access the new information, determine and order the exact amount of material needed, and make necessary changes to the construction schedule. The collaboration between client, architect, and contractor is handled efficiently and at any given time of the day.

There are many companies that provide cloud computing solutions tailored to the construction industry, including a wide range of solutions from estimating and takeoffs, to managing contracts, subcontractor and supplier bids, cash flows and budgets, and scheduling. There are options varying from complete solutions for managing all aspects of a construction business to individualized services including project management or payroll solutions.

When considering a cloud solution, business owners want a solution that will assist in running their business more efficiently and enable a faster project delivery. Before committing and investing in any cloud solution, business owners should request a free demo to test drive.

In order to perform an accurate cost comparison, determine what the current computing costs are including all software licensing and hardware costs. Moving computing needs into the cloud eliminates the need for the costly servers once needed to run all its software. In addition, business owners should be aware of all the costs of the cloud services purchased. There may be an increase in cost if the business grows or more users are added.

Also, will there be 24-hour support and what kind of turnaround is the vendor required to meet if an issue arises? Business owners should choose a provider that is always accessible and can resolve any issue quickly.

Cloud computing solutions with an Application Programming Interface (API) will be straightforward and easy to use. A complicated program may hamper employees for months, decreasing the businesses efficiency. This is where the free demo comes into play.

Everyone concerned wants to be assured that data is safe and secure. All providers should routinely backup businesses’ data and have multiple data centers where data is mirrored to provide enough redundancy should something critical happen to the main center where data is stored. By choosing a provider that encrypts data and provides data-leak prevention, business owners can be sure their data is secure.

Invariably, computer networks go down and business owners should look for providers that offer service priority and use multiple network paths to ensure the service is always available.

Cloud computing services should allow scalability and be able to grow with a business or shrink if it downsizes. Business owners should read and thoroughly understand the service agreement before making any decisions.

 
A profile of Allen County PDF Print E-mail

BY ED GEBERT

Business Journal Writer

egebert@timesbulletin.com

 

LIMA — Allen County, Ohio, in northwestern Ohio with 105,298 persons in residence, lies at the crossroads of a pair of major thoroughfares favored for shipping by road to the north, south, east, or west. Interstate 75 provides access to Allen County from the north and south, while four-lane, limited-access U.S. 30 handles east-west traffic. The highways are convenient for county employers like Ford Motor Co., General Dynamics, Procter & Gamble, Husky Energy/Lima Refining, MetoKote Corp., Nickles Bakery, Lima Memorial Health System, St. Rita’s Medical Center, and Lima City Schools.

The highways also provide convenience for members of the workforce heading to the job. The State of Ohio reports that almost 82 percent of the workers have less than a 30-minute drive to work, half of those have a commute of less than 15 minutes.

The majority of the population is near the City of Lima, which is the county seat. Lima’s population was 38,771 in the 2010 census. The City of Delphos was home to 3,922 that year and the Villlage of Bluffton had 4,081. Also within Allen County, Bath Township has a population of 9,569, Shawnee Township has 12,290 and American Township contains 12,379 as of the same census. Of the total population, 83.6 percent are white and 12 percent are African-American, and 17.7 percent is the percentage of minority population within the county

Of the 27,393 families, 37.5 percent are married couples with both husband and wife in the workforce. Another 19.6 percent of families are married with either the husband or wife in the work- force. Families within the county have incomes above the poverty level 86.5 percent of the time.

Just over 37 percent of households in Allen County have an average income between $10,000-$40,000, while another 33.5 percent earn between $50,000-$199,000 annually. Around 82 percent of workers live within a 30-minute commute of their place of employment. That figures to a mean travel time of 19.2 minutes.

The average home in the county is occupied by its owner. Almost 70 percent are owner-occupied with 30 percent rented. The median year build of Allen County homes is 1962. The average value of owner-occupied homes in the county is $104,400. More than 40 percent of homes have been built since 1980. Nearly 65 percent of the homes are heated with utility gas and another 22 percent are heated with electricity.

Allen County is home to several places listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A full 30 properties and districts are listed, including the Allen County Courthouse, Lima Stadium, the Miami and Eric Canal Deep Cut, St. John Catholic Church in Delphos, the Lima Post Office, the Ohio Theater, Lima Memorial Hall, and the Armory-Latisona Building in Lima.

Also in the county are many attractions like the Allen County Museum, the MacDonell House Victorian Mansion, an observatory, art gallery, minor league sports teams the Lima Locos and Lima Warriors, public golf courses, and parks districts.

The latest unemployment reports show Allen County with a 5.0 percent unemployment rate, the lowest monthly rate since the late summer of 2001. The labor force is given as 48,500 with 2,400 of those unemployed. Two years earlier, the number of unemployed was 3,500 and a rate of 7.1 percent. The county suffered through the economic downturn at the end of the century’s first decade with double-digit jobless rates in both 2009 and 2010 and 9.6 percent in 2011.

Allen County saw 122 business starts in 2013, making 1,938 total businesses in the county. There are five television stations, 11 radio stations, two daily and two weekly newspapers in the county. In 42 public school buildings, an average of 17,116 students are educated by 995.9 teacher full-time equivalents. There are also seven non-public schools with another 1,734 students. The county has four public colleges, universities or university branches, including Ohio State University-Lima.

Across the county, the 904 farms use 183,186 acres of land. Nearly two-thirds of the land is cropland with another 17.76 percent listed as residential/commercial/industrial/transportation and urban grasses. Just over eight percent is forest and another 4.26 percent is in pasture. Total agricultural cash receipts in the county is $144,091,000 with three-quarters of those receipts from crops and the other one-quarter from livestock and other products.

 
McLane Company breaks ground on Findlay Grocery Distribution Center PDF Print E-mail

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FINDLAY – Texas-based McLane Company, one of the nation’s leading wholesale suppliers to grocery retailers and restaurants, broke ground on a new facility on October 16. The company’s Findlay distribution center is located at 3200 McLane Drive.

The McLane Company grocery distribution center will create 425 jobs and invest $119 million into their new facility in Findlay, Ohio. McLane’s Grocery unit services more than 45,000 retail locations nationwide. The company expects this highly automated distribution center to greatly enhance its efficiency in servicing its valued customers throughout the Great Lakes region.

“We are excited to see the hard work on this project come to fruition,” said Findlay•Hancock County Economic Development Director Anthony Iriti, who worked closely with McLane executives and JobsOhio to bring the company to Findlay. “It has been our goal to bring skilled jobs, like those that will be needed at this cutting-edge facility. We are pleased to have McLane’s state-of-the-art facility as our anchor for the new industrial park.”

Lt. Governor Mary Taylor attended the groundbreaking ceremony, as well as Ohio Representative Robert Sprague, McLane COO Mike Youngblood, City of Findlay Mayor Lydia Mihalik, and Hancock County Commissioners Mark Gazarek, Philip Riegle, and Brian Robertson.

“The McLane Company is an excellent addition to the Findlay and Hancock County community, said Findlay Mayor, Lydia Mihalik. “This is yet again a testament that our community has the ability to attract innovative and emerging businesses.”

“We considered expansion sites in several states,” said McLane COO Mike Youngblood. “However, after working closely with the Governor‘s office and local officials in Hancock County, we were soon convinced that Findlay, Ohio was the best location for our newest grocery distribution center. We are confident in the strong, productive workforce there, and we recognize and appreciate all that is in place to help make a business like ours successful.”

 

(About McLane: McLane Company, Inc., is a $44 billion supply chain services leader providing grocery, foodservice and beverage solutions for convenience stores, mass merchants, drug stores and chain restaurants throughout the U.S. McLane buys, sells and delivers more than 50,000 different consumer products to nearly 90,000 locations across the U.S., and is a wholly owned unit of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (NYSE: BRK).

About JobsOhio: JobsOhio is a private, non-profit corporation designed to drive job creation and new capital investment in Ohio through business attraction, retention, and expansion efforts. Find out more at jobs-ohio.com.

 

The Findlay•Hancock County Alliance is a partnership bringing growth and prosperity to the Findlay/Hancock County community. Through a strong economic development focus, leadership programs, business building initiatives and volunteer opportunities, the Alliance helps position its community among the best micropolitan communities in the United States. The Alliance is a blend of the area’s best resources including the Findlay•Hancock County Chamber of Commerce, Findlay-Hancock County Economic Development and the Hancock County Convention & Visitors Bureau.)

 
Your sales voice: what is it saying to you, what is it saying to others? PDF Print E-mail

I was recently at Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas, giving a seminar sponsored by Sales & Marketing Executives International. I had an informal logistics meeting with some of the association members before the event when Jamie, the young woman who directed me to my preparation room, talked to me about her career. I asked her what she was seeking to become.

Her response startled me. She said, “I’m still trying to find my voice.”

I was taken aback because I expected some alternate career choice, or something along the lines of “make a lot of money,” or “get a job in event planning.” But no, she was seeking something much higher.

Jamie was seeking to gain control of her self and her power first, and find her career path second. We talked about “voice” for a while, and I began to type to capture the thoughts. What came out of the brief conversation will benefit you and your career, and help you understand who you are and who you seek to become.

Jamie was looking for her voice to come from something she believed in that would make her voice stronger, more resonant, more powerful, and more believable.

How do you speak?

Not the just words, the voice that you project. Your voice is a statement and picture of your character, your poise, and your persona. It’s a statement of belief, confidence, and personal power.

Where does your voice come from?

How do you “find” it?

And once you do, how do you master it?

BE AWARE: Your voice has nothing to do with your selling skills or your product knowledge. Your voice is way beyond that.

GOOD NEWS: You don’t have to look far. Most of your voice is right at the tip of your tongue. The rest of it is mental and emotional.

ANSWER: It STARTS with your inner voice. It’s the language you speak to yourself BEFORE you say a word.

Your voice becomes yours, and authentically yours, when you…

• do what you believe in.

• do what you’re passionate about.

• work in your chosen field.

• find your calling.

• discover something you feel you were made or born to do.

• do something you love.

EASY WAY TO START THE DISCOVERY: Write down the hobby or sport you love best, or the sporting event you go to because you love to see your team play and cheer them on.

My friend, Hall of Fame baseball player Dave Winfield, said it as simply and as completely as I have ever heard it, “I loved baseball and baseball loved me back.”

Here are the elements of voice:

You have decided to pursue your chosen path.

You have belief in who you are.

You have belief in what you do.

You have a desire to succeed.

You’re personally prepared – attitude, enthusiasm, friendliness, and ideas.

You maintain self-confidence that comes from your heart, not from your head.

Your enthusiasm is real.

Your sincerity is evident.

You’re eager to master every aspect of what you do.

Your passion is contagious.

Your moxie engages others.

Your desire to improve is never ending.

You love what you do.

NOTE WELL: Your voice is not about how to make sales faster – your voice is how to make sales forever. For your voice to appear, you must possess ALL of these elements. Most people have a “weak” voice because they don’t love what they do, or lack sincerity, or they don’t fully believe in themselves, their company, or their product.

SUCCESS ACTION: Go back to this list and rate yourself on a 1-10 basis. Ten being the best, your highest possible score is 130. My bet is you’re 90 or below.

SUCCESS ACTION: Record your spoken voice ONCE A WEEK, and listen to it actively – which means take notes. By listening to yourself – arguably one of the toughest things on the planet to do – you will gain a true picture of where you are right now. Your jumping off point.

And for those of you living in the dark ages still trying to “find the pain” in your sales presentation, just record and listen to yourself – THAT’S the pain. The real pain of selling is listening to your voice trying to make a sale – it’s also funny as hell.

You’ll know your voice when you hear it.

It will speak to you before you ever say a word.

 

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training, seminars, and webinars - or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.

 
Steyer Seeds donates $160,000 to the Stefanie Spielman Fund at Farm Science Review PDF Print E-mail

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TIFFIN, Ohio – Steyer Seeds® wrapped up its first annual “Seeds for Hope” campaign in partnership with the Stefanie Spielman Fund for Breast Cancer Research.

The company donated $1 per unit sold of SureStandTM and $3 per unit of SureStandTM Clariva Complete Beans sold from October 2013 to May 2014 to the Stefanie Spielman Fund for Breast Cancer Research at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center–Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. The amount totaled more than $160,000.

“We saw farmers rally behind the cause, and we are delighted to present the Stefanie Spielman Fund with this donation,” said Ben Steyer, vice president of sales and marketing for Steyer Seeds. “Several of our team members at Steyer have been impacted by breast cancer, so it is especially meaningful for our group.”

The check presentation took place on Tuesday, Sept. 16, at 3 p.m. at the Steyer booth during the Farm Science Review.

“The entire donation will go directly to research,” Director of the Community Partners Program for the hospital Kim Collins said. “With each contribution, we are closer to a cure, and that’s why we are so thankful for support from Steyer Seeds and farmers in the region who supported the initiative.”

In addition to the check presentation, Steyer had activities at its booth throughout the show, including a football toss game where five contestants with the highest scores will win an NFL Breast Cancer Awareness edition football and additional raffles.

Seed treatments are products used to protect against microorganisms and fungi that can be detrimental for crops. Steyer’s SureStand product functions as an insecticide/fungicide treatment and growth promoter that maximizes plant performance.

SureStand Clariva Complete Beans is a soybean seed treatment combination that protects against a broad spectrum of early-season insects and diseases; it also offers season-long activity against soybean cyst nematode. The product optimizes root health to deliver better plant emergence and stand, nutrient uptake and water usage, stress tolerance and overall soybean performance.

Color is typically added to seed treatments to differentiate various formulations, as well as prevent accidental consumption or use. Seed treatments sold as a part of “Seeds for Hope” were pink.

 

About Steyer Seeds

Steyer Seeds, established in Tiffin, Ohio, in 1985, has gained a strong foothold in the heart of the Midwest’s competitive wheat, corn, soybean and alfalfa producing area and is dedicated to serving professional farmers. The Steyer family started farming in 1949 when Art Steyer purchased 144 acres near Fort Seneca, Ohio. The company has had a facility in Mason City, Ill., since 2010, and has a team of sales representatives throughout the Midwest, including Ohio and Illinois. Steyer believes that seed purchases today are an investment in a farmer’s future and is committed to providing the finest value and highest return by utilizing outstanding quality, exceptional biotechnology, value-oriented programs and tools and personalized relationships and services. For more information on Steyer Seeds, visit www.steyerseeds.com.

 

About The Stefanie Spielman Fund for Breast Cancer Research

The Stefanie Spielman Fund for Breast Cancer Research at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute was established in 1999 by Stefanie and Chris Spielman after Stefanie was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 30 in 1998. Knowing that research is key to helping find a cure, the fund is dedicated to advancing breast cancer research through innovative therapies, treatment options and novel diagnostics. Since its inception, the Spielman Fund has raised more than $15 million. Before she passed away in November 2009 after a decade-long battle, Stefanie left us with some final thoughts: Continue to fight. Continue to live. For more information, visit http://www.spielmanfund.com or follow us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/SpielmanFund for updates. Click here to Unsubscribe

 
First Financial Bank expands specialty banking team and launches business capital division PDF Print E-mail

 

CINCINNATI – First Financial Bank is proud to announce the expansion of its specialty banking leadership team and the launch of First Financial Business Capital, a division of First Financial Bank.

“As we continue to experience strong growth within our specialty banking group, the establishment of the Business Capital division is a natural evolution,” said Brad Ringwald, First Financial’s President of Specialty Banking. “It’s unique for a bank our size to offer asset based, cash flow and mezzanine lending, and we look forward to working with businesses across the Midwest to help them grow and experience greater success.”

First Financial first began offering specialty banking products and services, including asset based lending and equipment finance, in 2011. The group has experienced great success over the past three years and recently expanded its product offering to include cash flow and mezzanine lending.

Steve Fields will serve as Senior Vice President and Director of First Financial Business Capital. He joins the bank with more than 30 years of experience providing asset based and cash flow lending to middle market companies. He has spent a majority of his career in the asset based lending group at U.S. Bank. There, he developed and managed regional and national sales origination teams. Most recently, he led the business development efforts of Alliance Business Lending, a commercial finance company located in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Stephen Wood will serve as Senior Vice President and Director of First Financial Equipment Finance. Wood has more than 35 years of experience in a variety of leadership roles within the industrial, manufacturing, and banking sectors. In his 20 years of commercial banking experience, Wood has held senior and executive level positions in both credit and lending. He joined First Financial Bank in 2010 and most recently served as the Commercial Real Estate Credit Officer for the bank.

“I’m really proud of the leadership team we have in place,” continued Ringwald. “With their vision and expertise, I’m confident we can help more business owners across the region grow and expand in 2015 and beyond.”

For more information about First Financial Bank and the Specialty Banking Group, visit www.bankatfirst.com.

 
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