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3 proven management techniques that work in any business PDF Print E-mail
Written by Delphos   
Thursday, July 31, 2014 8:13 AM

Within the first five years of a small-business venture, about half do not survive, according to the government’s Small Business Administration. And after 10 years, only a third are still around.

“Successful entrepreneurship hits the bull’s eye of the American dream, but most simply do not make it,” says veteran Texas businessman David M. Smith, author of “The Texas Spirit,” (www.TheTexasSpiritBook.com).

“You don’t have to have extravagant wealth or a degree from Harvard to make it; a successful business requires essentially the same thing for a successful life – perspective.”

Smith reviews some common denominators for success.

• Aim at nothing and you always hit it. “If you’re like me – perhaps with a touch of ADD and someone who wants to do too many things than you have time for – this is a helpful aphorism,” Smith says. Not every idea that comes to mind should be pursued; be very selective with your time, and when you go after something, go full-throttle.

• You cannot win on the defensive in business or any other endeavor. Don’t think in terms of defense; instead, think of counterattack. To take a defensive position on anything means that you have conceded at least some of your position.

• Work toward optimal employment for everyone in your company. “At least once a year, I have a one-on-one discussion with every person in our companies – a renegotiation to hopefully renew employment for a longer period,” he says. “This adds an important personal touch and attention to detail.” Of course, the same approach offers an excellent return in your personal relationships, too.

• Keep in mind Union Pacific’s motto: “Safety is my responsibility.” Safety should always rank high in your priorities; it’s easy to take it for granted until a catastrophe happens. Texmark celebrates more than 25 years without a production-halting accident – a remarkable record in the industry.

• Organize projects, planning and profit action with at least three people, but never more than five. You need a point person for the meeting and at least two compatible partners – more than five people gums up the process. Meet weekly; the point man should set priorities and is most responsible for action.

• People chemistry is more important than process chemistry. Just as you must have a process for making chemicals built around operating conditions that are best for the desired chemical products, so too should you have the right chemistry of people working together. The right chemistry is trickier than you think.

• Promote voluntary participation regarding medical benefits and thrift and savings plans. It’s always best to put individuals in charge of their health and financial destiny – to let people consciously choose their plans. Monolithic systems arbitrarily imposed by institutions are the beginning of stagnated individual responsibility.

 

(David M. Smith is the author of “The Texas Spirit,” www.TheTexasSpiritBook.com (2014; Halcyon Press). He’s the founder and owner of Chemical Exchange, Inc. and Texmark Chemicals of Galena Park, Texas. An El Paso native, he attended the University of Texas in Austin. Early in his career, he moved east to Houston and established himself in the petrochemical industry. His new book, “The Texas Spirit,” features a series of essays about the ways in which the United States can benefit from Texas’ example, including economic models and moral fiber.)

 
Tuttle Services receives Fit-Friendly Worksite awards PDF Print E-mail
Written by Delphos   
Thursday, July 31, 2014 8:09 AM

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LIMA – Tuttle Services, Inc. has been recognized by the American Heart Association by receiving the Fit-Friendly Worksite Gold Achievement and the Worksite Innovation Awards. Among the elite group of awardees, Tuttle was one of four organizations within a five-state region to be presented the Worksite Innovation Award.

Tuttle Services, Inc. and its subsidiary companies, Tuttle Construction and Touchstone CPM, implemented the Fit-Friendly Worksite Recognition Program to increase physical activity in the workplace and to promote a culture of wellness. Throughout the year, a variety of wellness programs and healthy living educational sessions were implemented to encourage and support the staff in their wellness endeavors.

Studies suggest that by utilizing a worksite physical activity program and promoting a culture of activity, employers can: increase productivity, reduce absenteeism and reduce healthcare costs.

“Our employees are our most valuable asset and we believe in promoting their health and well-being by offering opportunities to engage in wellness activities and supporting one another to embrace a healthy lifestyle,” said Paul Crow, President of Tuttle Construction.

 

(Since its origin in 1928, Tuttle has built a strong reputation throughout the region by consistently exceeding customers’ expectations. Tuttle offers a wide range of construction services for the industrial, institutional, and commercial markets. Construction Management services are also provided through Tuttle Services’ subsidiary, Touchstone CPM. Operating on a philosophy based on professional ethics and high standards, Tuttle is driven to provide successful projects that include value-added intangibles, which foster long-term relationships. For more information, please visit: www.tuttlenet.com or www.touchstonecpm.com.)

 
How to overcome excuses PDF Print E-mail
Written by Delphos   
Thursday, July 31, 2014 8:06 AM

Great people throughout history often fail, quite miserably, before finally reaching their goals, says international business strategist Dan Waldschmidt.

“Van Gogh sold only one painting during his lifetime; Winston Churchill lost every public election until becoming prime minister at age 62; Henry Ford went bankrupt five times; Albert Einstein was a terrible student and was expelled from school; Sigmund Freud was booed from a stage,” says Waldschmidt, author of “Edgy Conversations: How Ordinary People Achieve Outrageous Success,” (www.EdgyConversations.com).

“Ideas, brilliance, genius – they all mean nothing without the guts, passion and tenacity necessary to make your dream a reality. But often, people fall back on excuses and give up on trying to reach their goals.”

Most of us have dreams, and many of us have big ones, but few of us actually see them through, he says.

He offers six tricks for jumping off the excuse train and forge the path to your goals.

• Avoid the need to blame others for anything. Mean, small-minded people know that they suck. That’s why they are so cranky and eager to point out others’ mistakes. They hope that by causing others to feel inadequate, everyone will forget about how woefully off the mark their own performance is. Don’t blame anyone, for any reason, ever. It’s a bad habit.

• Stop working on things that just don’t matter. Not everything needs to be done in place of sleep. If you work for a boss, then you owe them solid time. You can’t cut that out. You can, however, cut out television time, meetings and anything else that gets in the way of achieving your goals. Replace entertainment with activity toward your goal.

• Refuse to let yourself wallow in self-doubt. You’re alive to succeed. Stop comparing your current problems to your last 18 failures. They are not the same. You are not the same. Here’s something to remember: Your entire life has been a training ground for you to capture your destiny right now. Why would you doubt that? Stop whining. Go conquer.

• Ask yourself, “What can I do better next time?” And then do it next time. If you spend a decade or two earnestly trying to be better, that’s exactly what will happen. The next best thing to doing something amazing is not doing something stupid. So learn from your mistakes and use the lessons to dominate.

• Proactively take time to do things that fuel your passion. Exercise is a great example. Living in the moment requires you to live at peak performance. A huge part of mental fitness is physical fitness. A sparring or running partner is a great way to refresh physical competition. Physical activity accelerates mental motivation.

• Apologize to yourself and those around you for having a bad attitude. Do this once or twice and you’ll snap out of your funk pretty fast. When you start genuinely apologizing for being a bad influence on those around you, you learn to stop whining and start winning.

(Dan Waldschmidt is the author of “Edgy Conversations: How Ordinary People Achieve Outrageous Success,” (www.EdgyConversations.com). He is an international business strategist, speaker, author and extreme athlete. His consulting firm solves complex marketing and business strategy problems for savvy companies all over the world.)

 
Ohio’s natural gas production nearly doubles from 2012 to 2013 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Delphos   
Thursday, July 31, 2014 7:44 AM

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CANTON – Ohio’s natural gas production nearly doubled from 2012 to 2013 because of increasing activity in the Utica shale and continued development of midstream infrastructure. The announcement came today at the “State of the Play” event at Stark State College.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) released data for 352 horizontal shale wells that reported production in 2013. The wells drilled in the Utica and Marcellus shale produced 3.6 million barrels of oil and 100 billion cubic feet of gas. On average, Ohio’s oil and gas production increased approximately 65 percent quarter to quarter from first quarter 2013 to first quarter 2014.

“Ohio’s oil and gas industry is growing and moving our state toward energy independence,” said ODNR Director James Zehringer. “At the same time, we have updated our laws and increased our staff to provide Ohioans the proper protections as the industry continues to grow.”

ODNR projects all oil and gas wells in Ohio produced 8 million barrels of oil and 171 billion cubic feet of gas in 2013. Compared to 2012, Ohio’s total oil production increased by 62 percent and natural gas production increased by 97 percent. The percentage increase in natural gas production is the largest in Ohio history, and the total production is the fourth highest annual total in state history. ODNR also released production data for the first quarter of 2014. A total of 418 wells reported production of 1.9 million barrels of oil and 67 billion cubic feet of gas.

The production growth depends heavily on the development of the midstream infrastructure needed to transfer the resources to market. In a little more than 24 months, a new industry developed, including 11 processing facilities and miles of new pipelines. Companies have spent or have committed more than $6 billion on midstream infrastructure.

“Companies are investing billions of dollars and creating jobs for Ohioans, proving the value and importance of the Utica shale play,” said JobsOhio Senior Managing Director David Mustine.

Ohio’s regulatory agencies, including the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Ohio Department of Commerce and ODNR have taken steps to improve their permitting and inspection processes. The agencies have made concerted efforts to implement regulations and rules that are clear, concise and protect Ohioans and the environment. ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.gov.

 
Genoa Bank names Cassin as new AVP, Commercial Loan officer PDF Print E-mail
Written by Delphos   
Thursday, July 31, 2014 7:28 AM

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GENOA, Ohio — GenoaBank, a locally owned, independent, community bank, announced Mark Cassin’s appointment as a new Assistant Vice President, Commercial Loan Officer for the Sylvania Branch in Sylvania.

With over 35 years of experience in the banking industry, Cassin is sure to continue the high quality levels of professionalism and customer service GenoaBank customers have received for years.

“Mark brings a great amount of expertise to our Commercial Lending Department. We are confident he will serve our customers commercial lending needs, while increasing GenoaBank’s lending ability across all areas,” said Martin P. Sutter, GenoaBank’s President and CEO.

Cassin will be based in the bank’s Crossroads branch while construction continues for Sylvania, but will be available to provide commercial lending at any of the bank’s other branches. He will be serving the communities in Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan.

Cassin attended University of Toledo, specializing in Business Management. Cassin who is actively involved in his community is the trustee and committee member for the University of Findlay. He is chairman of the finance committee at St. Michael Parish and School. He resides in Findlay with his wife and three children.

 

(GenoaBank, founded in 1902, is now in its second century of providing a broad range of banking services to business and private customers in Lucas, Wood, Ottawa, and Sandusky Counties. The bank has assets of $275 million and operates branch offices in Genoa, Elmore, Maumee, Millbury, Oregon, and Rossford, Ohio.)

 
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